[Howto] Three commands to update Fedora

Fedora Logo Bubble

These days using Fedora Workstation there are multiple commands necessary to update the entire software on the system: not everything is installed as RPMs anymore – and some systems hardly use RPMs at all anyway.

Background

In the past all updates of a Fedora system were easily applied with one single command:

$ yum update

Later on, yum was replaced by DNF, but the idea stayed the same:

$ dnf update

Simple, right? But not these days: Fedora recently added capabilities to install and manage code via other ways: Flatpak packages are not managed by DNF. Also, many firmware updates are managed via the dedicated management tool fwupd. And lost but not least, Fedora Silverblue does not support DNF at all.

GUI solution Gnome Software – one tool to rule them all…

To properly update your Fedora system you have to check multiple sources. But before we dive into detailed CLI commands there is a simple way to do that all in one go: The Gnome Software tool does that for you. It checks all sources and just provides the available updates in its single GUI:

The above screenshot highlights that Gnome Software just shows available updates and can manage those. The user does not even know where those come from.

If we have a closer look at the configured repositories in Gnome Software we see that it covers main Fedora repositories, 3rd party repositories, flatpaks, firmware and so on:

Using the GUI alone is sufficient to take care of all update routines. However, if you want to know and understand what happens underneath it is good to know the separate CLI commands for all kinds of software resources. We will look at them in the rest of the post.

System packages

Each and every system is made up at least of a basic set of software. The Kernel, a system for managing services like systemd, core libraries like libc and so on. With Fedora used as a Workstation system there are two ways to manage system packages, because there are two totally different spins of Fedora: the normal one, traditionally based on DNF and thus comprised out of RPM packages, and the new Fedora Silverblue, based on immutable ostree system images.

Traditional: DNF

Updating a RPM based system via DNF is easy:

$ dnf upgrade
[sudo] password for liquidat: 
Last metadata expiration check: 0:39:20 ago on Tue 18 Jun 2019 01:03:12 PM CEST.
Dependencies resolved.
================================================================================
 Package                      Arch       Version             Repository    Size
================================================================================
Installing:
 kernel                       x86_64     5.1.9-300.fc30      updates       14 k
 kernel-core                  x86_64     5.1.9-300.fc30      updates       26 M
 kernel-modules               x86_64     5.1.9-300.fc30      updates       28 M
 kernel-modules-extra         x86_64     5.1.9-300.fc30      updates      2.1 M
[...]

This is the traditional way to keep a Fedora system up2date. It is used for years and well known to everyone.

And in the end it is analogue to the way Linux distributions are kept up2date for ages now, only the command differs from system to system (apt-get, etc.)

Silverblue: OSTree

With the recent rise of container technologies the idea of immutable systems became prominent again. With Fedora Silverblue there is an implementation of that approach as a Fedora Workstation spin.

[Unlike] other operating systems, Silverblue is immutable. This means that every installation is identical to every other installation of the same version. The operating system that is on disk is exactly the same from one machine to the next, and it never changes as it is used.

Silverblue’s immutable design is intended to make it more stable, less prone to bugs, and easier to test and develop. Finally, Silverblue’s immutable design also makes it an excellent platform for containerized apps as well as container-based software development development. In each case, apps and containers are kept separate from the host system, improving stability and reliability.

https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/fedora-silverblue/

Since we are dealing with immutable images here, another tool to manage them is needed: OSTree. Basically OSTree is a set of libraries and tools which helps to manage images and snapshots. The idea is to provide a basic system image to all, and all additional software on top in sandboxed formats like Flatpak.

Unfortunately, not all tools can be packages as flatpak: especially command line tools are currently hardly usable at all as flatpak. Thus there is a way to install and manage RPMs on top of the OSTree image, but still baked right into it: rpm-ostreee. In fact, on Fedora Silverblue, all images and RPMs baked into it are managed by it.

Thus updating the system and all related RPMs needs the command rpm-ostreee update:

$ rpm-ostree update
⠂ Receiving objects: 98% (4653/4732) 4,3 MB/s 129,7 MB 
Receiving objects: 98% (4653/4732) 4,3 MB/s 129,7 MB... done
Checking out tree 209dfbe... done
Enabled rpm-md repositories: fedora-cisco-openh264 rpmfusion-free-updates rpmfusion-nonfree fedora rpmfusion-free updates rpmfusion-nonfree-updates
rpm-md repo 'fedora-cisco-openh264' (cached); generated: 2019-03-21T15:16:16Z
rpm-md repo 'rpmfusion-free-updates' (cached); generated: 2019-06-13T10:31:33Z
rpm-md repo 'rpmfusion-nonfree' (cached); generated: 2019-04-16T21:53:39Z
rpm-md repo 'fedora' (cached); generated: 2019-04-25T23:49:41Z
rpm-md repo 'rpmfusion-free' (cached); generated: 2019-04-16T20:46:20Z
rpm-md repo 'updates' (cached); generated: 2019-06-17T18:09:33Z
rpm-md repo 'rpmfusion-nonfree-updates' (cached); generated: 2019-06-13T11:00:42Z
Importing rpm-md... done
Resolving dependencies... done
Checking out packages... done
Running pre scripts... done
Running post scripts... done
Running posttrans scripts... done
Writing rpmdb... done
Writing OSTree commit... done
Staging deployment... done
Freed: 50,2 MB (pkgcache branches: 0)
Upgraded:
  gcr 3.28.1-3.fc30 -> 3.28.1-4.fc30
  gcr-base 3.28.1-3.fc30 -> 3.28.1-4.fc30
  glib-networking 2.60.2-1.fc30 -> 2.60.3-1.fc30
  glib2 2.60.3-1.fc30 -> 2.60.4-1.fc30
  kernel 5.1.8-300.fc30 -> 5.1.9-300.fc30
  kernel-core 5.1.8-300.fc30 -> 5.1.9-300.fc30
  kernel-devel 5.1.8-300.fc30 -> 5.1.9-300.fc30
  kernel-headers 5.1.8-300.fc30 -> 5.1.9-300.fc30
  kernel-modules 5.1.8-300.fc30 -> 5.1.9-300.fc30
  kernel-modules-extra 5.1.8-300.fc30 -> 5.1.9-300.fc30
  plymouth 0.9.4-5.fc30 -> 0.9.4-6.fc30
  plymouth-core-libs 0.9.4-5.fc30 -> 0.9.4-6.fc30
  plymouth-graphics-libs 0.9.4-5.fc30 -> 0.9.4-6.fc30
  plymouth-plugin-label 0.9.4-5.fc30 -> 0.9.4-6.fc30
  plymouth-plugin-two-step 0.9.4-5.fc30 -> 0.9.4-6.fc30
  plymouth-scripts 0.9.4-5.fc30 -> 0.9.4-6.fc30
  plymouth-system-theme 0.9.4-5.fc30 -> 0.9.4-6.fc30
  plymouth-theme-spinner 0.9.4-5.fc30 -> 0.9.4-6.fc30
Run "systemctl reboot" to start a reboot

Desktop applications: Flatpak

Installing software – especially desktop related software – on Linux is a major pain for distributors, users and developers alike. One attempt to solve this is the flatpak format, see also Flatpak – a solution to the Linux desktop packaging problem.

Basically Flatpak is a distribution independent packaging format targeted at desktop applications. It does come along with sandboxing capabilities and the packages usually have hardly any dependencies at all besides a common set provided to all of them.

Flatpak also provide its own repository format thus Flatpak packages can come with their own repository to be released and updated independently of a distribution release cycle.

In fact, this is what happens with the large Flatpak community repository flathub.org: all packages installed from there can be updated via flathub repos fully independent from Fedora – which also means independent from Fedora security teams, btw….

So Flatpak makes developing and distributing desktop programs much easier – and provides a tool for that. Meet flatpak!

$ flatpak update
Looking for updates…

        ID                                            Arch              Branch            Remote            Download
 1. [✓] org.freedesktop.Platform.Locale               x86_64            1.6               flathub            1.0 kB / 177.1 MB
 2. [✓] org.freedesktop.Platform.Locale               x86_64            18.08             flathub            1.0 kB / 315.9 MB
 3. [✓] org.libreoffice.LibreOffice.Locale            x86_64            stable            flathub            1.0 MB / 65.7 MB
 4. [✓] org.freedesktop.Sdk.Locale                    x86_64            1.6               flathub            1.0 kB / 177.1 MB
 5. [✓] org.freedesktop.Sdk.Locale                    x86_64            18.08             flathub            1.0 kB / 319.3 MB

Firmware

And there is firmware: the binary blobs that keep some of our hardware running and which is often – unfortunately – closed source.

A lot of Kernel related firmware is managed as system packages and thus part of the system image or packaged via RPM. But device related firmware (laptops, docking stations, and so on) is often only provided in Windows executable formats and difficult to handle.

Luckily, recently the Linux Vendor Firmware Service (LVFS) gained quite some traction as the default way for many vendors to make their device firmware consumable to Linux users:

The Linux Vendor Firmware Service is a secure portal which allows hardware vendors to upload firmware updates.

This site is used by all major Linux distributions to provide metadata for clients such as fwupdmgr and GNOME Software.

https://fwupd.org/

End users can take advantage of this with a tool dedicated to identify devices and manage the necessary firmware blobs for them: meet fwupdmgr!

$ fwupdmgr update                                                                                                                                                         No upgrades for 20L8S2N809 System Firmware, current is 0.1.31: 0.1.25=older, 0.1.26=older, 0.1.27=older, 0.1.29=older, 0.1.30=older
No upgrades for UEFI Device Firmware, current is 184.65.3590: 184.55.3510=older, 184.60.3561=older, 184.65.3590=same
No upgrades for UEFI Device Firmware, current is 0.1.13: 0.1.13=same
No releases found for device: Not compatible with bootloader version: failed predicate [BOT01.0[0-3]_* regex BOT01.04_B0016]

In the above example there were no updates available – but multiple devices are supported and thus were checked.

Forgot something? Gnome extensions…

The above examples cover the major ways to managed various bits of code. But they do not cover all cases, so for the sake of completion I’d like to highlight a few more here.

For example, Gnome extensions can be installed as RPM, but can also be installed via extensions.gnome.org. In that case the installation is done via a browser plugin.

The same is true for browser plugins themselves: they can be installed independently and extend the usage of the web browser. Think of the Chrome Web Store here, or Firefox Add-ons.

Conclusion

Keeping a system up2date was easier in the past – with a single command. However, at the same time that meant that those systems were limited by what RPM could actually deliver.

With the additional ways to update systems there is an additional burden on the system administrator, but at the same time there is much more software and firmware available these ways – code which was not available in the old RPM times at all. And with Silverblue an entirely new paradigm of system management is there – again something which would not have been the case with RPM at all.

At the same time it needs to be kept in mind that these are pure desktop systems – and there Gnome Software helps by being the single pane of glas.

So I fully understand if some people are a bit grumpy about the new needs for multiple tools. But I think the advantages by far outweigh the disadvantages.

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[Howto] Rebasing Fedora Silverblue – even from Rawhide to Fedora 30

silverblue-logo

I recently switched to Fedora Silverblue, the immutable desktop version of Fedora. With Silverblue, rebasing is easy – even when I had to downgrade from Rawhide to a stable release!

Fedora Silverblue is an interesting attempt at providing an immutable operating system – targeted at desktop users. Using it on a daily base helps me to get more familiar with the toolset and the ideas behind it which are also used in other projects like Fedora Atomic or Fedora CoreOS.

When Fedora 30 was released I decided to give it a try, went to the Silverblue download page – and unfortunately picked the wrong image: the one for Rawhide.

Rawhide is the rolling release/development branch of Fedora, and is way too unstable for my daily usage. But I only discovered this when I had it already installed and spent quite some time on customizing it.

But Silverblue is an immutable distribution, so switching to a previous version should be no problem, right? And in fact, yes, it is very easy!

Silverblue supports rebasing, switching between different branches. To get a list of available branches, first list the name of the remote source, and afterwards query the available references/branches:

[liquidat@heisenberg ~]$ ostree remote list
fedora
[liquidat@heisenberg ~]$ ostree remote refs fedora
[...]
fedora:fedora/30/x86_64/silverblue
fedora:fedora/30/x86_64/testing/silverblue
fedora:fedora/30/x86_64/updates/silverblue
[...]
fedora:fedora/rawhide/x86_64/silverblue
fedora:fedora/rawhide/x86_64/workstation

The list is quite long, and does list multiple operating system versions.

In my case I was on the rawhide branch and tried to rebase to version 30. That however failed:

[liquidat@heisenberg ~]$ rpm-ostree rebase fedora/30/x86_64/silverblue
1 metadata, 0 content objects fetched; 569 B transferred in 4 seconds
Checking out tree 7420c3a... done
Enabled rpm-md repositories: rawhide
Updating metadata for 'rawhide'... done
rpm-md repo 'rawhide'; generated: 2019-05-13T08:01:20Z
Importing rpm-md... done
⠁  
Forbidden base package replacements:
  libgcc 9.1.1-1.fc30 -> 9.1.1-1.fc31 (rawhide)
  libgomp 9.1.1-1.fc30 -> 9.1.1-1.fc31 (rawhide)
This likely means that some of your layered packages have requirements on newer or older versions of some base packages. `rpm-ostree cleanup -m` may help. For more details, see: https://githResolving dependencies... done
error: Some base packages would be replaced

The problem was that I had installed additional packages in the meantime. Note that there are multiple ways to install packages in Silverblue:

– Flatpak apps: this is the primary way that apps get installed on Silverblue.
– Containers: which can be installed and used for development purposes.
– Toolbox containers: a special kind of container that are tailored to be used as a software development environment.

The other method of installing software on Silverblue is package layering. This is different from the other methods, and goes against the general principle of immutability. Package layering adds individual packages to the Silverblue system, and in so doing modifies the operating system.

https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/fedora-silverblue/getting-started/

While Flatpak in itself is a pretty cool solution to the Linux desktop packaging problem it usually comes with sandboxed environments, making it less usable for integrated tools and libraries.

For that reason it is still possible to install RPMs on top, in a layered form. This however might result in dependency issues when the underlying image is supposed to change.

This is exactly what happened here: I had additional software installed, which depended on some specific versions of the underlying image. So I had to remove those:

[liquidat@heisenberg ~]$ rpm-ostree uninstall fedora-workstation-repositories golang pass vim zsh

Afterwards it was easy to rebase the entire system onto a different branch or – in my case – a different version of the same branch:

[liquidat@heisenberg ~]$ rpm-ostree rebase fedora/30/x86_64/silverblue
1 metadata, 0 content objects fetched; 569 B transferred in 2 seconds
Staging deployment... done
Freed: 47,4 MB (pkgcache branches: 0)
  liberation-fonts-common 1:2.00.3-3.fc30 -> 1:2.00.5-1.fc30
  [...]
Downgraded:
  GConf2 3.2.6-26.fc31 -> 3.2.6-26.fc30
  [...]
Removed:
  fedora-repos-rawhide-31-0.2.noarch
  [...]
Added:
  PackageKit-gstreamer-plugin-1.1.12-5.fc30.x86_64
  [...]
Run "systemctl reboot" to start a reboot

And that’s it – after a short systemctl reboot the machine was back, running Fedora 30. And since ostree works with images the reboot went smooth and quick, long sessions of installing/updating software during shutdown or reboot are not necessary with such a setup!

In conclusion I must say that I am pretty impressed – both by the concept as well as the execution on the concept, how well Silverblue works in a day to day situation even as a desktop. My next step will be to test it on a Laptop on the ride, and see if other problems come up there.