[Howto] Writing an Ansible module for a REST API

Ansible LogoAnsible comes along with a great set of modules. But maybe your favorite tool is not covered yet and you need to develop your own module. This guide shows you how to write an Ansible module – when you have a REST API to speak to.

Background: Ansible modules

Ansible is a great tool to automate almost everything in an IT environment. One of the huge benefits of Ansible are the so called modules: they provide a way to address automation tasks in the native language of the problem. For example, given a user needs to be created: this is usually done by calling certain commandos on the shell. In that case the automation developer has to think about which command line tool needs to be used, which parameters and options need to be provided, and the result is most likely not idempotent. And its hard t run tests (“checks”) with such an approach.

Enter Ansible user modules: with them the automation developer only has to provide the data needed for the actual problem like the user name, group name, etc. There is no need to remember the user management tool of the target platform or to look up parameters:

$ ansible server -m user -a "name=abc group=wheel" -b

Ansible comes along with hundreds of modules. But what is if your favorite task or tool is not supported by any module? You have to write your own Ansible module. If your tools support REST API, there are a few things to know which makes it much easier to get your module running fine with Ansible. These few things are outlined below.

REST APIs and Python libraries in Ansible modules

According to Wikipedia, REST is:

… the software architectural style of the World Wide Web.

In short, its a way to write, provide and access an API via usual HTTP tools and libraries (Apache web server, Curl, you name it), and it is very common in everything related to the WWW.

To access a REST API via an Ansible module, there are a few things to note. Ansible modules are usually written in Python. The library of choice to access URLs and thus REST APIs in Python is usually urllib. However, the library is not the easiest to use and there are some security topics to keep in mind when these are used. Out of these reasons alternative libraries like Python requests came up in the past and are pretty common.

However, using an external library in an Ansible module would add an extra dependency, thus the Ansible developers added their own library inside Ansible to access URLs: ansible.module_utils.urls. This one is already shipped with Ansible – the code can be found at lib/ansible/module_utils/urls.py – and it covers the shortcomings and security concerns of urllib. If you submit a module to Ansible calling REST APIs the Ansible developers usually require that you use the inbuilt library.

Unfortunately, currently the documentation on the Ansible url library is sparse at best. If you need information about it, look at other modules like the Github, Kubernetes or a10 modules. To cover that documentation gap I will try to cover the most important basics in the following lines – at least as far as I know.

Creating REST calls in an Ansible module

To access the Ansible urls library right in your modules, it needs to be imported in the same way as the basic library is imported in the module:

from ansible.module_utils.basic import *
from ansible.module_utils.urls import *

The main function call to access a URL via this library is open_url. It can take multiple parameters:

def open_url(url, data=None, headers=None, method=None, use_proxy=True,
        force=False, last_mod_time=None, timeout=10, validate_certs=True,
        url_username=None, url_password=None, http_agent=None,
force_basic_auth=False, follow_redirects='urllib2'):

The parameters in detail are:

  • url: the actual URL, the communication endpoint of your REST API
  • data: the payload for the URL request, for example a JSON structure
  • headers: additional headers, often this includes the content-type of the data stream
  • method: a URL call can be of various methods: GET, DELETE, PUT, etc.
  • use_proxy: if a proxy is to be used or not
  • force: force an update even if a 304 indicates that nothing has changed (I think…)
  • last_mod_time: the time stamp to add to the header in case we get a 304
  • timeout: set a timeout
  • validate_certs: if certificates should be validated or not; important for test setups where you have self signed certificates
  • url_username: the user name to authenticate
  • url_password: the password for the above listed username
  • http_agent: if you wnat to set the http agent
  • force_basic_auth: for ce the usage of the basic authentication
  • follow_redirects: determine how redirects are handled

For example, to fire a simple GET to a given source like Google most parameters are not needed and it would look like:

open_url('https://www.google.com',method="GET")

A more sophisticated example is to push actual information to a REST API. For example, if you want to search for the domain example on a Satellite server you need to change the method to PUT, add a data structure to set the actual search string ({"search":"example"}) and add a corresponding content type as header information ({'Content-Type':'application/json'}). Also, a username and password must be provided. Given we access a test system here the certification validation needs to be turned off also. The resulting string looks like this:

open_url('https://satellite-server.example.com/api/v2/domains',method="PUT",url_username="admin",url_password="abcd",data=json.dumps({"search":"example"}),force_basic_auth=True,validate_certs=False,headers={'Content-Type':'application/json'})

Beware that the data json structure needs to be processed by json.dumps. The result of the query can be formatted as json and further used as a json structure:

resp = open_url(...)
resp_json = json.loads(resp.read())

Full example

In the following example, we query a Satellite server to find a so called environment ID for two given parameters, an organization ID and an environment name. To create a REST call for this task in a module multiple, separate steps have to be done: first, create the actual URL endpoint. This usually consists of the server name as a variable and the API endpoint as the flexible part which is different in each REST call.

server_name = 'https://satellite.example.com'
api_endpoint = '/katello/api/v2/environments/'
my_url = server_name + api_endpoint

Besides the actual URL, the payload must be pieced together and the headers need to be set according to the content type of the payload – here json:

headers = {'Content-Type':'application/json'}
payload = {"organization_id":orga_id,"name":env_name}

Other content types depends on the REST API itself and on what the developer prefers. JSON is widely accepted as a good way to go for REST calls.

Next, we set the user and password and launch the call. The return data from the call are saved in a variable to analyze later on.

user = 'abc'
pwd = 'def'
resp = open_url(url_action,method="GET",headers=headers,url_username=module.params.get('user'),url_password=module.params.get('pwd'),force_basic_auth=True,data=json.dumps(payload))

Last but not least we transform the return value into a json construct, and analyze it: if the return value does not contain any data – that means the value for the key total is zero – we want the module to exit with an error. Something went wrong, and the automation administrator needs to know that. The module calls the built-in error functionmodule.fail_json. But if the total is not zero, we get out the actual environment ID we were looking for with this REST call from the beginning – it is deeply hidden in the json structure, btw.

resp_json = json.loads(resp.read())
if resp_json["total"] == 0:
    module.fail_json(msg="Environment %s not found." % env_name)
env_id = resp_json["results"][0]["id"]

Summary

It is fairly easy to write Ansible modules to access REST APIs. The most important part to know is that an internal, Ansible provided library should be used, instead of the better known urllib or requests library. Also, the actual library documentation is still pretty limited, but that gap is partially filled by the above post.

Ways to provide body payload in Ansible’s URI module

Ansible LogoTalin to a REST API requires to provide some information, usually in the form of JSON payload. Ansible offers various ways to do that in the URI module in playbooks.

In modern applications REST APIs are often the main API to integrate the given APP with the existing infrastructure. REST often requires posting JSON structures as payload.

Ansible offers the URI module to talk to REST APIs, and there are multiple ways add JSON payload to a playbook task that are shown below.

For example, given that the following arbitrary JSON payload needs to be provided to a REST API via POST:

{
  "mainlevel": {
    "subkey": "finalvalue"
  }
}

The first and for me preferred way to provide JSON payloads is to write down the structure in plain YAML (if possible) and afterwards tell the module to format it as JSON:

HEADER_Content-Type: application/json
status_code: 202
body: 
  mainlevel:
    subkey: finalvalue
body_format: json

Among various reasons this works well because variables can be easily used.

Another way is to define a variable and then use jinja to format it:

vars:
  mainlevel:
    "subkey": finalvalue
...
    body: ' {{mainlevel|to_json}}'

Caution: not the empty space here in the body line. It avoids type detection which tries to check if a string begins with { or [.

A quicker, shorter way is to use folded style:

body: >
  {"mainlevel":{"subkey":"finalvalue"}}

However, it might be difficult to add variables here.

Last, and honestly something I would try to avoid is the plain one-liner:

body: "{\"mainlevel\":{\"subkey\":\"finalvalue\"}}

As it can be seen, all quotation marks need to be escaped which makes it hard to read, hard to maintain and easy to introduce errors.

As shown Ansible is powerful and simple. Thus there are always multiple different ways to reach the goal you are aiming for – and it depends on the requirements what solution is the best one.

[Short Tip] Query all registered repositories in Red Hat Satellite

redhat

The idea of RESTful APIs is pretty appealing: using the basic components of the WWW as APIs to bring together services. Operations like HTTP GET and POST, base URIs and media types like JSON are supported almost everywhere simply because the web is supported almost everywhere, it is pretty easy to provide REST enabled servers, services and clients with a few clicks and calls. For this reason the API of Red Hat Satellite – and most of the other Red Hat products – is built as REST API.

I’ve already written an article about how to access the Satellite REST API via Ansible. Today I came across a rather handy example: sometimes you need to know the URLs of the Satellite provided repos. This can of course be queried via the API. But in contrast to my old article, we do not query the Foreman part of the api ($SATELLITE_URL/api/) but the Katello part: /katello/api/.

All repositories can be shown via the URL /katello/api/repositories?organization_id=1. To query URLs on the command line I recommend Ansible:

$ ansible localhost -m uri -a "method=GET user=admin password=$PASSWORD force_basic_auth=yes validate_certs=no url=https://satellite-server.example.com/katello/api/repositories?organization_id=1&full_results=true"
localhost | SUCCESS => {
    "apipie_checksum": "7cd3aad709af2f1ae18a3daa0915d712", 
    "cache_control": "must-revalidate, private, max-age=0", 
    "changed": false,
...
    "id": 45, 
    "label": "EPEL_7_-_x86_64", 
...
    "product": {
      "cp_id": "1452001252604", 
      "id": 127, 
      "name": "EPEL", 
      "sync_plan": [
        "name", 
        "description", 
        "sync_date", 
        "interval", 
        "next_sync"
      ]
    }, 
    "relative_path": "Platin/Library/custom/EPEL/EPEL_7_-_x86_64", 
    "url": "http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/7/x86_64/"
...

The option full_results just ensures that the entire result is shown even if it is pretty long. Note that the product I can be used to query the entire product information:

$ ansible localhost -m uri -a "method=GET user=admin password=$PASSWORD force_basic_auth=yes validate_certs=no url=https://satellite-server.example.com/katello/api/products/127"
localhost | SUCCESS => {
...
  "id": 127, 
  "label": "EPEL", 
  "last_sync": "2016-01-05 13:43:38 UTC", 
  "last_sync_words": "about 1 month", 
  "name": "EPEL", 
  "organization": {
...

The id of the repository can be used to query the full repository information, including a full repo path:

$ ansible localhost -m uri -a "method=GET user=admin password=$PASSWORD force_basic_auth=yes validate_certs=no url=https://satellite-server.example.com/katello/api/repositories/45"      
localhost | SUCCESS => {
...
  "content_type": "yum", 
  "full_path": "http://satellite-server.example.com/pulp/repos/Platin/Library/custom/EPEL/EPEL_7_-_x86_64",
...

If you want to skip the part figuring out the IDs manually but have a name you could search for, it is possible to filter the results. The search URL for this case would be: /katello/api/repositories?organization_id=1&full_results=true&search=*EPEL*" as shown in the following example:

$ ansible localhost -m uri -a "method=GET user=admin password=$PASSWORD force_basic_auth=yes validate_certs=no url=https://satellite-server.example.com/katello/api/repositories?organization_id=1&full_results=true&search=*EPEL*"
localhost | SUCCESS => {
...
  "relative_path": "Platin/Library/custom/EPEL/EPEL_7_-_x86_64", 
...

[Howto] Access Red Hat Satellite REST API via Ansible [Update]

Ansible LogoAs with all tools, Red Hat Satellite offers a REST API. Ansible offers a simple way to access the API.

Background

Most of the programs and functions developed these days offer a REST API. Red Hat for example usually follows the “API first” methodology with most of the products these days, thus all functions of all programs can be accessed via REST API calls. For example I covered how to access the CloudForms REST API via Python.

While exploring a REST API via Python teaches a lot about the API and how to deal with all the basic tasks around REST communication, in daily enterprise business API calls should be automated – say hello to Ansible.

Ansible offers the URI module to work with generic HTTP requests. It offers various authentication modules, can pass general headers and provides ways to deal with different return codes and has a generic body field. Together with Ansible’s extensive variable features this makes the ideal combination for automated REST queries.

Setup

The setup is fairly simple: a Red Hat Satellite Server in a newer version (6.1 or newer), Ansible, and that’s it. The URI module in Satellite comes pre-installed.

Since the URI module accesses the target hosts via http, the actual host executing the http commands is the host on which the playbooks run. As a result, the host definition in the playbook needs to be localhost. In such case it doesn’t make sense to gather facts, either, so gather_facts: no can be set to save time.

In the module definition itself, it might make sense for test environments to ignore certification errors if the Satellite server certificate is not properly signed: validate_certs: no. Also, sometimes the Python library stumbles upon the status code 401 to initiate authentication. In that case, the option force_basic_auth: yes might help.

Last but not least, the API itself must be understood. The appropriate documentation is pretty helpful here: Red Hat Satellite API Guide. Especially the numerious examples at the end are a good start to build own REST calls in Ansible.

Getting values

Getting values via the REST API is pretty easy – the usual URL needs to be queried, the result is provided as JSON (in this case). The following example playbook asks the Satellite for the information about a given host. The output is reduced to the puppet modules, the number of modules is counted and the result is printed out.

$ cat api-get.yml
---
- name: call API from Satellite
  hosts: localhost
  gather_facts: no
  vars:
    satelliteurl: satellite-server.example.com
    client: helium.example.com

  tasks:
    - name: get modules for given host from satellite 
      uri:
        url: https://{{ satelliteurl }}/api/v2/hosts/{{ client }}
        method: GET 
        user: admin
        password: password
        force_basic_auth: yes 
        validate_certs: no
      register: restdata
    - name: output rest data
      debug: msg="{{ restdata.json.all_puppetclasses | count }}" 

The execution of the playbook show the number of the installed Puppet modules:

$ ansible-playbook api-get.yml

PLAY [call API from Satellite] ************************************************ 

TASK: [get ip and name from satellite] **************************************** 
ok: [localhost]

TASK: [output rest data] ****************************************************** 
ok: [localhost] => {
    "msg": "8"
}

PLAY RECAP ******************************************************************** 
localhost                  : ok=2    changed=0    unreachable=0    failed=0

If the Jinja filter string | count is removed, the actual Puppet classes are listed.

Performing searches

Performing searches is simply another URL, and thus works the exact same way. The following playbook shows a search for all servers which are part of a given Puppet environment:

---
- name: call API from Satellite
  hosts: localhost
  gather_facts: no
  vars:
    satelliteurl: satellite-server.example.com
    clientenvironment: production

  tasks:
    - name: get Puppet environment from Satellite 
      uri:
        url: https://{{ satelliteurl }}/api/v2/hosts/?search=environment={{ clientenvironment }}
        method: GET 
        user: admin
        password: password
        force_basic_auth: yes 
        validate_certs: no
      register: restdata
    - name: output rest data
      debug: msg="{{ restdata.json }}"

Changing configuration: POST

While querying the REST API can already be pretty interesting, automation requires the ability to change values as well. This can be done by changing the method: in the playbook to POST. Also, additional headers are necessary, and a body defining what data will be posted to Satellite.

The following example implements the example CURL call from the API guide mentioned above to add another architecture to Satellite:

$ cat api-post.yml
---
- name: call API from Satellite
  hosts: localhost
  gather_facts: no
  vars:
    satelliteurl: satellite-server.example.com

  tasks:
    - name: set additional architecture in Satellite 
      uri:
        url: https://{{ satelliteurl }}/api/architectures
        method: POST
        user: admin
        password: password
        force_basic_auth: yes 
        validate_certs: no
        HEADER_Content-Type: application/json
        HEADER_Accept: :application/json,version=2
        body: >
          {"architecture":{"name":"i686"}}
      register: restdata
    - name: output rest data
      debug: msg="{{ restdata }}"

The result can be looked up in the web interface: an architecture of the type i686 can now be found.

Update
Note that the body: > notation, folded scalars, makes it much easier to paste payload. If you are providing the payload without the closing bracket but on the same line, all the quotation marks need to be escaped:

body: "{\"architecture\":{\"name\":\"i686\"}}"

Conclusion

Ansible can easily access, query and control the Red Hat Satellite REST API and thus other REST APIs out there as well.

Ansible offers the possibility to automate almost any tool which expose a REST API. Together with the dynamic variable system results from one tool can easily be re-used to perform actions in another tool. That way even complex setups can be integrated with each other via Ansible rather easy.