[Short Tip] Add a path entry to Nushell

Sometimes, if you cannot properly transfer files to your phone, try another mtp implementation!

Adding a path in nushell is pretty straight forward: the configuration is done in ~/config/nu/config.toml in the [path] section.

If you don’t have it, make sure that the default entries are listed there as well when you start bringing in your own directories. The fastest way to populate your configuration with the default entries is to ask nushell to do it: config set path $nu.path

Next, add the directories you need:

path = ["/usr/local/bin", "/usr/local/sbin", "/usr/bin", "/usr/sbin","/home/rwolters/go/bin"]

In the above example I added the default go binary directory to the list.

[Short Tip] Define an alias in Nushell

A few days ago I decided to switch my main shell to nushell. It offers next generation capabilities similar to other modern shells like Powershell:

Rather than thinking of files and services as raw streams of text, Nu looks at each input as something with structure. For example, when you list the contents of a directory, what you get back is a table of rows, where each row represents an item in that directory.

Nushell Philosophy

This switch feels like the biggest shell related change for me since I switched from Windows Command Prompt to Bash. Even the switch from Bash to ZSH was small in comparison.

As part of this I have to relearn how to do a lot of things. For example, defining an alias is totally different.

The nushell configuration takes place in ~.config/nu/config.toml. To add an alias there, add the section startup if it is not there already, and add a list item there:

startup = [
    "alias evince = flatpak run org.gnome.Evince",
    "alias ll = ls -la",
    ]

In the above example two aliases are given, one to call ls, and one for launching evince via flatpaks.

Image by julia roman from Pixabay