Apache’s market share dropped below 50%

Tux
Netcraft once again released a web server survey. And for the first time for several years Apache’s market share for active sites dropped below 50%.

Yet again bad news for Apache. While it is still the leader its market share for active sites dropped below 50% according to Netcraft. To underline the development with Netcraft’s words:

While that’s still a considerable lead, Apache had a 33.4% advantage at this time last July, meaning Microsoft has cut its deficit in half in the past 12 months.

I already asked about the reasons behind this on-going development – and got many insightful answers.
And these answers indicate that this is an ongoing development which will not change for the near future. It has nothing to do with the GoDaddy move or the Google web server analysis change btw., but it has a lot to do with integrated tools, languages and services, market strategies and user friendliness.

Usually I would not have any problem if there are competing products and if one product gains market share in favour of another. However, the only web server really gaining market share is the IIS, and Microsoft yet has to prove that there will not be another “Browser war” with closed source expansions only Microsoft’s products can handle. The web is one of the few places which Microsoft failed to pollute with proprietary stuff. It would be a pity if that would change.

Anyway, I still wonder if the Apache guys are actually reacting to this development in any way – or if they just remain calm and hope that this development will cease sometime somehow. I really hope that they come up with a good counter-strategy. It couldn’t hurt anyway…

14 thoughts on “Apache’s market share dropped below 50%”

  1. Watch the discussions at LinuxToday. Netcraft is becoming irrelevant because companies game the parked domain card to gain mindshare and momentum.

  2. I looks like some of Apach’e share has been taken by this “Google” server. I didn’t know Google had their own server package, but because they are a lot bigger on OSS/Linux than MS, I’m sure it was attractive to current Apache users, whatever it is.

  3. I think I’ve once read somewhere that “Google” (i.e. GFE – Google Front End) as mentioned in the netcraft survey is Apache-based.

  4. Roy, the numbers I referred to are the active domains – these numbers exclude parked domains. And the domain parking was afaik always well identified by Netcraft – even if you clean up the results in regard to domain parking Apache is declining all the time.

    And even if not: when mass domain parking services switch to IIS there are reasons as well. And these reasons, regardless of what kind they are, should get attention.

    Anyway, you referred to a discussion at LinuxToday, but I’m not sure what you mean. Can you post a link?

    Schalken, red_alert, Netcraft changed the analysis categories and included GFE from Google as its own type. Previously it was counted as Apache. However, this switch is already months old and is not the reason for the decline of the last months. Plus, even if you add Google’s server back to Apache you still have a dropping market share for Apache.

  5. That lighttpd exist (born, like many other light static-content servers, to solve apache’s deficiences) and youtube needs to use it is a proof that apache is not the leader it used to be…..

  6. @ liquidat: thanks, I overlooked that part. The discussions at LT basically revolved around the fact that hosts are being /paid/ to choose Windows. It is a long-term investment. I heard from hosts *myself*. They are offered free stuff.

    Only two says ago in an interview, Cringley (?) said that Microsoft has a history of tolerating huge losses just so that they can crush the opposition and then monopolise (elevate prices). Just look at Intel and their margins as well.

  7. But other than httpd Apache, there are other Apache based servers like Tomcat, Geronimo – does this survey include these too as Apache or did they just mean httpd Apache ?

  8. Roy, while I would not be surprised if people were paid to switch it is questionable if this explains o large numbers. And even if – Apache should do something in any case. At the moment there is no movement at all…

    But about the huge looses: that is well known. Microsoft looses hundreds of millions with XBox, but they can afford it…

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