A new Skype version for Linux – featuring ALSA!

skypeLooks like I was a bit too fast with last guess that skype for Linux is dead: there is a new beta version available – with support for both, ALSA as well as OSS! I haven’t tested it yet because I do not sit at my home computer right now, but I will test it most certainly this evening.

This development makes it much easier for me to talk and stay in contact with several of my friends because I now can use skype together with my other sound stuff. Previously I opened skype only when I knew that some one would call me because I also had to shut down my music player and free the audio device (yes, welcome in the open sound system hell).

Anyhow, this is now over. Still, I would prefer a open source solution, but since no one really stepped in front to make this possible easy, fast and soon, I have to stay with skype for the close future. And however had a look behind the shiny gui knows that skype is not as nice as it tries to look like – from a security point of view, skype is evil, no doubt there…

6 thoughts on “A new Skype version for Linux – featuring ALSA!”

  1. There’s a command called ‘aoss’ that let’s you wrap up any program so that it uses alsa, even if it has no support for it. Happilly you don’t need it anymore with Skype, but there are still some programs out there with these kind of annoyances. For instance, have you noticed that the flash plugin doesn’t use alsa either? I worked it around by launching ‘aoss firefox’ instead of firefox (actually I edited the script that launches the real binary) and in the case of Konqueror by ticking the option that makes the plugins use artswrapper and -since I don’t use arts- replacing artswrapper with a link to ‘aoss’. I’m sharing it because it drove me crazy until I managed to play Youtube videos and still listen to my music, for example🙂

  2. I know aoss, but that is *very* difficult to set up, and it does not work in any way as far as I know. But thank you anyway for the comment, I appreciate any tip in this direction.

    I just do not understand why you still find so much OSS only stuff (think about the stable realplayer/helixplayer, flash, the stable skype, etc.)…

  3. Thanks for the link – and yes, you have to make these tunings, that is what I meant with “is *very* difficult to set up”. It is compulsory to make these adjustments, and there are enough people where it never worked (afaik).

    And about wengo – well, it is SIP. And to be honest, I never understood how people can like SIP. Sure, it is open standard, and it is supported by many companies. But besides that? The setup is a horror as soon as you have a bit difficult network situation. Ever tried to use two SIP systems behind one home router? Or even stranger setups?
    From my point of view SIP is only sensible for large companies where you can use Asterix servers and that stuff, but not for home users.

    There is a alternative, jabber/jingle: it still needs some love, and is not very spread, but if I would have to place a bet: never on SIP, but probably on jabber/jingle. It is a bit strange that many people believe that a SIP solution like wengo could compete with a P2P solution like Skype. From my point of view this is a strange and silly dream…

  4. Please, read the comment above: SIP is not usefull when you are behind more complex network systems. Try to set up two SIP computers in a lokal network (192.168.x.x) behind a home router – impossible afaik. Additionally, the NAT setup is always a bit difficult to set up.

    Sure, Wengo or Ekiga can do this automatically, but you have to enter tunnel servers or something for your SIP service – and that’s not a userfriendly solution (read “user” as “dumb user”).

    And, why should we use SIP? The whole SIP idea is obsolete since we have the possibility to use p2p (I do not mean skype, but jabber/jingle or something new). Do not stick to a obsolete technique which is far inferior to something else, already available and proved that it worked fast and good.

    If you still think that SIP is superior to p2p solutions: why do you think so many people use skype on their computers?

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